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So the first stop along the epic sightseeing tour of the Lake District is absolutely awesome!

Castlerigg Stone Circle near Keswick was built in pre-history.

Firstly it has one of the best views anywhere! A full 360 degree panorama with Fells surrounding you from all sides.

Helvellyn, Skiddaw and the mighty Blencathra are 3 of the many fells that can all be seen from here. 

Who built it?

 

Stop number two along the sightseeing tour of the Lake District is along the old (Roman) road from Keswick to Penrith, near Guardhouse. (that's a strange placename!)

From here you get a brilliant view of the mighty fell Blencathra!

Lots of history and legends around this wonderful mountain!

A surprise for many, along the sightseeing tour of the Lake District. Is another legend as local tradition says that St. Patrick came to Patterdale in the early 5th century, that he converted many local people to Christianity and that the Dale is named after him (St. Patrick’s Dale or Patterdale). Near the Church and War Memorial is St. Patrick’s Well, where it is said he baptised and preached to local folk!

There are many Legends to discover on the route of our sightseeing tour of the Lake District.

Urien Rheged is one of them. The son of Cynfarch Oer, was a late sixth century warrior king of Rheged, an early British kingdom of Hen Ogledd ('the Old North'), the Brythonic Celtic speaking region of what is now Northern England and southern Scotland.

One of the Welsh Triads lists Urien as one of the "Three Great Battle-leaders of Britain", he was possibly one of the earliest Christian Kings in Britain. Urien's father Cynfarch Oer was the great great grandson of Coel Hen (Old King Cole), the first recorded post-Roman military leader in the area of Hadrian's Wall.

Urien united Rheged, which had been divided between him and his brothers, Llew and Arawn, who ruled north of the Solway Firth, probably in Galwyddel (Galloway). Urien's power base was around Penrith, he also had a palace at Llwyfenydd on the River Lyvennet, to the south of Penrith. He had another palace possibly at Caer-Brogwm (Brougham), which is next to King Arthur's Round Table and Mayburgh Henge at Eamont Bridge.